Following in Charles and Diana’s footsteps, Wills and Kate visit Uluru as sun sets on one of most stunning sites on earth

A member of one of the most respected Aboriginal families in the local Anangu community greeted the couple
The Duke and Duchess watched an Aborigine Welcome to Country ceremony
They also walked a short distance around the base of Uluru
William’s parents Prince Charles and the late Princess Diana made the same trip in 1983

1
Bathed in an orange glow, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge saw the majesty of Uluru at sunset for themselves today.
In a scene reminiscent of William’s parents the Prince and Princess of Wales 31 years ago, the couple posed for photographs at the legendary beauty spot  – formerly known as Ayers Rock – in the heart of the Australian Outback.
At first William and Kate seemed a little self conscious as they posed for photographers.

2
‘So what shall we talk about,’ the prince joked to his wife
Kate, who’d changed from her earlier designer Roksanda Illincic  dress into a cream one from high street chain Hobbs, clasped her hands in front as William, who initially had his hands behind his back, pointed out features on the rock.
Kate meanwhile batted away the ever-present flies and pushed the occasional stray hair away from her face. A school girl, who was lucky enough to witness the moment, told Kate: ‘You were both like magic when the photos were being taken, I was like ‘How are they not swatting flies away?’
Kate laughed: ‘I know. It was difficult.’ Added William: ‘They were all coming for us.’
Moments later, William said to Kate: ‘It’s a beautiful sight though. Quite breath-taking.’

3
As the blazing sun began to dip behind the monolith, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge trekked along a red-dirt path towards Uluru’s pock-holed base.
For a handful of minutes, theirs was the desert kingdom; alone to breathe in one of the deeply spiritual environs for the local Indigenous tribes – the waterhole along the Kuniya walk.
‘It’s nice and peaceful down there, very peaceful,’ Prince William said.
Guides point to two important ancestral beings surrounding the waterhole – Kuniya, the woma python woman and Liru the poisonous snake man, whom the latter clobbered over the head with a stick and avenged the wounding of her offspring.
Women’s intuition apparently, the prerogative of using force to protect one’s children.
The Duchess chuckled when she read the lesson on the interpretive sign.
After their brief private moment by the waterhole, the Royal couple veered right up a pathway to a small cave, where they viewed Aboriginal artwork painted onto the base of Uluru.
Their guide, Sammy Wilson, couldn’t be better placed to explain what the artwork meant and the significance to the Mutitjulu people.
His grandfather painted it; one of the last paintings to be splashed on the side of the massive rock.
‘They had already seen that old bloke dance at the cultural centre, well that is the story of this place,’ Mr Wilson said.
Fellow guide John Sweeney said the couple were ‘very, very interested in everything that was said.
‘Yes, they were very inquisitive and a pleasure to have on a tour,’ he said.
‘They asked about the markings on the rock where the waterfalls flow.
‘You see this place can’t be explained quickly, you need to go on a walk like the Royal couple did and see the marks on the rocks which are an actual record of the ancestors it is something that can only learnt by walking here and having that experience.’
Earlier int the day the couple took part in an Aborigine Welcome to Country ceremony at Uluru-Kata Tjuta Cultural Centre.
After meeting elders from the Anangu people of Uluru, they gathered around a camp fire to watch the Inma ritual which incorporates traditional clapping sticks.
The ritual was the way the Anangu people formally acknowledged the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s arrival to their land.
Kate and William watched intently as dancers smeared with white paint performed in a ceremonial circle. 
Speaking in Pitjantjatjara, the language of the Anangu, an elder explained the meaning of the dances which was then translated into English for Kate and William.
Catherine had made a wardrobe change from her arrival outfit into a Hobbs grey and white summer dress, sensibly ditching the heels for a pair of wedges, which in moments became caked in red dust.
A boy from the community presented the duke and duchess with a basket of Mala poo paper paintings – surely one of the tour’s less likely gifts.
The couple appeared to enjoy the display, asking questions of their hosts and admiring their gifts, which also included a carved wooden (punu) shield.

45
Catherine spoke with a group of elderly Anangu women before moving to the fireside, the fragrant bloodwood smoke filing the small spectator area.
Loud laughter went up from Catherine when William made a joke about a wooden snake that sat near the fire.
At the end of the dance, the Duchess smiled and spoke with Adam Giles, the Northern territory Chief Minister and Australia’s first indigenous head of government.
At the Uluru Cultural Centre, Prince William and Kate chatted soccer, rugby union and mathematics in a relaxed and animated encounter with nine Northern Territory high school children from some of the most remote schools in Australia.

6
At a tea party hosted by Australia’s first indigenous head of government, Northern Territory Chief Minister, Adam Giles, Prince William at one point joked about his lack of mathematical skills.
After Mr Giles invited the eight girls and one boy to do a Q and A with the Duke and Duchess, the Prince said, laughing, ‘just don’t ask me about Pythagoras’.
Erin Keeley, from Nhulunbuy High School on the north eastern tip of the Territory, talked about her studies with the Duchess.
Following the sudden death of he mother earlier this year, she wants to be a social worker.

7
After speaking for several minutes with Kate about her future, the Duchess said, ‘Really good luck with your studies.’
When the the girls asked to to be in a photograph with the royal couple, William responded in a self-deprecating manner, ‘Well if you don’t mind having a photograph with us.’
Chevez Kirkman, 15, who excels in maths and sport at Nyangatjatjara College, was asked by Prince William if he followed an English soccer side.
When Chevez said no, the Duke suggested his own side, saying, ‘If you were to have one, maybe Aston Villa would be a good one.’

8
Earlier the royal tourists presented certificates to tourism and hospitality graduates from the National Indigenous Training Academy at Yulara, and met some of the excited locals.
They were met at the academy’s entrance by general manager, Marea Moulton, and other officials from the facility.
‘We’re both really excited to be here,’ William said while shaking hands with Moulton.
Kate added: ‘We’re looking forward to meeting the students inside.’
As they walked inside, Kate batted a fly away from her face. ‘I was told about the flies,’ she laughed.
Inside the facility they were introduced to senior staff, who were undertaking further hospitality and tourism studies, and five trainees.
William seemed keen to ask what sort of things were taught at the academy and the length of the various courses.
‘I see a couple of spare seats over there,’ William joked as he entered the room. ‘Should I be joining the class?’

9101112
Misty Smith, 18, and Mark Campbell, 19, took the Duke and Duchess over to a map of Australia and told them where their families are from.
‘How’s your geography?’ William joked to Kate.
Misty said she was impressed by Kate’s interest in the various programmes of study: ‘Kate asked me if this is the only course available. She said she was really interested in the history of the people here,’ she explained later.
‘She also asked us if we [the trainees] knew each other before starting the course or if we became friends here. She said she loved her school days.’

131415161718
Afterwards the royal couple walked outside to present eight certificates to graduating students from the academy.
Barbara Kanda, 42, who belongs to Uluru’s Mutitjulu community, has worked at the Ayers Rock resort since 2012. She continues to receive further training at the academy and was today awarded a level 3 hospitality certificate by William and Kate at the short ceremony.
Mrs Kanda said: ‘William singled me out afterwards to congratulate me and ask about the training. He’s a gentleman.’
After receiving her certificate from Kate, Jasmine Jingles, 19, of Mornington Island, Queensland, said she was thrilled.
‘It’s amazing, deadly as,’ she enthused.
Francis Oba, 23, of the Torres Strait, was wished good luck for his future by Prince William.
Clutching his certificate, he said: ‘This is really great … we’re touched they came so far to be here.’
After the short ceremony, general manager Moulton presented the Duke – dressed like a bushman in in cream jeans, an open-necked shirt and with his sleeves rolled up – with a two metre hunting spear made from from mulga wood and kangaroo vein.

19202122
For the second time in Australia, Kate stepped out in a dress by London designer Roksanda Ilincic. The taupe cap-sleeved dress with a pale grey belt was a perfect fit for the 31C temperatures.
The Duke and Duchess were also given a punu (wooden bowl), clapping sticks, which are a type of musical instrument, and a small kangaroo hair blanket.
The traditional hunting spear was crafted by indigenous elder Hectar Burton and is made from barbed mulga wood and bound in traditional with kangaroo tendons.
Moulton says of handing William the weapon: ‘I joked with him that he could give Harry some training with it and he laughed.’ Kate then held the spear daintily, commenting: ‘You could do some damage [with this].’
The Duchess seemed pleased with a hand-painted bracelet she was given, putting it on immediately and marvelling at the detail that went into it.
Moulton says: ‘It’s made by some of the students here, who hand-painted [large nut-like seeds].’
Kate commented as she turned her wrist around: ‘It’s very pretty. It fits perfectly,’
The clapping sticks they were gifted were something the royal parents thought George would like.
‘George loves anything that makes noise,’ Kate said of the traditional instrument, which is made from locally sourced wood.

The red centre was buzzing with excitement about the royal visit – and with thousands of tiny flies.
Before a lush field of grass in the middle of the desert, the Anangu people waited under a tree for William and Kate at the National Indigenous Training Academy which provides training for the hospitality and tourism industries in 12-month residential courses.
Each of the 100 people who graduate each year are guaranteed work at the Ayers Rock Resort or other hotel complexes.
As the couple arrived at the academy, children from the adjoining Yulara State School chanted: ‘Hi, Kate!’
After the presentation, the couple went on a small walkabout to meet around 150 local well-wishers who had gathered to see them.
Kate gravitated towards a group of kids, telling a trio of young girls in tiaras: ‘You make lovely princesses.’
One of the girls’ mothers Emily Haskins, 39, later said: ‘Kate spoke to my [four-year-old] daughter Amelia and told her she looked pretty. She’s so beautiful. We asked if she missed George and she said yes.’

Kate’s new bracelet caught the eye of a 10-month-old baby in the crowd. While Kate spoke with his mother, the tot grabbed her wrist and wouldn’t let go. ‘They’re surprisingly strong at this age,’ Kate giggled.
Kate told Ms Haskin of Alice Springs she thought that the central Australian landscape was spectacular.
‘She said the red earth was stunning, that it was pretty hot and the flies were pretty friendly,’ Ms Haskin said.
After the gift giving, Kate was also reunited with her clutch, which she had handed over to 19-year-old Canendo, who she had met earlier.
‘I was really honoured when she asked me to hold her bag,’ she says. ‘I was really nervous looking after it. And, no, I did not want to look inside. I was glad she trusted me.
‘Kate is so elegant and beautiful.’
Bindi McPherson arrived straight from her job dressed in paint spattered shorts and a T-shirt to receive a certificate from the Duchess.
‘She was interested I was wearing painter’s gear’, she said. ‘I just came from a job. I said if she needed her nursery repainted, I know where there’s a good painter and she laughed.

She said the visit was a ‘pretty big event’ for a little town.
‘They’re royals, mate’, she added.
The Cambridges then met Northern Territory school students at an afternoon tea hosted by the Northern Territory’s chief minister, Adam Giles, who is Australia’s first indigenous head of Government.
While taking part in the afternoon tea – although the couple didn’t eat or drink anything themselves – William and Kate spoke with some more students from the academy. They both asked lots of questions about their studies and future plans.
Industry Workplace Trainer Liz Lotter, 41, says: ‘The Duke and Duchess showed so much interest in the work we do here. I was impressed and flattered.
‘You can tell they’re naturally curious characters as they both ask lots of interesting question.’
On their way out the couple stopped to chat with some children from the local Yulara School. William kneeled down in front of a group of giggling boys. When he realised they wouldn’t stop laughing, he just tickled their tummies and ran off.
About 150 people in the remote town pressed up against the fence surrounding Yulara Airport to get a look at the couple, who touched down just after 1pm local time.

They were greeted by the Administrator of the Northern Territory, Sally Thomas, her husband Duncan McNeill and Northern Territory Chief Minister Adam Giles and his wife Tamara.
Traditional owners Vincent Nipper, from one of the most respected Aboriginal families in the local Anangu community, and Daisy Walkabout, also welcomed the royal couple.
Mr Nipper said: ‘It’s very special to have the royal family here at this place and they’ll have a real special moment at the rock.’
William lingered as he spoke to Ms Walkabout, who greeted his parents Prince Charles and Diana on their trip to Uluru in 1983.
‘We’re happy to meet them, like we were happy to meet (Charles and Diana) in the past,’ Ms Walkabout said.
‘They’ve travelled a lot and now they will come to see this country, and it will be good to know they have seen Uluru, which is so hugely significant not just for a small group of people but a whole range of people that are related and connected to this place.’
The Anangu, the traditional owners of the land that includes Uluru, previously known as Ayers Rock, jointly manage the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park with Parks Australia, the federal parks agency.

23
The indigenous people have looked after the land for tens of thousands of years but only won back the title to the land in 1985 is what is known as the Handback.
Avril Shear and Lindsay Gordon, Sydney-siders originally from South Africa, extended their outback holiday at Uluru so they could see the Duke and Duchess as their motorcade left the airport.
‘I don’t know if he answered me specifically, but I said ‘welcome to Uluru’ and he said thanks,’ Ms Shear said.
‘I think it was the best glimpse of them we could have gotten.’
She said the couple were very natural.
‘I think the difference with them is that you know they’re so in love; it brings people a new hope, less of a stiff upper lip,’ she said.

Amanda Bartels’ and her ten-month-old son Nathan had made the five hour journey from Alice Springs to see the couple.
They spoke to the Duchess who sympathised with the problems of keeping a baby occupied during the journey. 
‘She related to the trials of travelling,’ Mrs Bartels said. ‘She let Nathan play with her bracelet’
‘My daughter Aimee-Grace gave her some native flowers’.
The couple will then visit the Uluru-Kata Tjuta Cultural Centre to learn about Uluru and neighbouring Kata Tjuta, the major geological features in the national park, both of which are sacred sites to the indigenous people.
They will also learn about Tjukurpa, the belief system of the indigenous people, though the full significance of Uluru is known only to the Anangu people, who do not share it with outsiders.
They will do a base walk around Uluru, and hopefully will be able to experience the silence of the desert.
The royal visitors left Prince George with his nanny in Canberra to take their Royal Australian Air Force flight to Yulara airport.
Uluru is one of the most remote places on earth, but the visit to the ancient monolith in the Central Australian Desert by Prince William and Kate will be like a meeting of old family friends – and a case of British royalty meeting Aboriginal royalty.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge flew into Uluru which is 460 km south west of the nearest town, Alice Springs, and more than 2000 km from Sydney.
Barbara Nipper Tjikatu, the grandmother of Vincent Nipper who greeted the royal couple upon arrival, will explain to the Duchess the special significance of Uluru as a spiritual ‘women’s place’ and tell her the traditional creation stories about the origin of the rock which is millions of years old.
Mrs Tjikatu, who is now in her eighties or nineties but does not know her exact date of birth, and her late husband Nipper Winmati were renowned bush trackers who were both involved in the hunt for the dingo after the disappearance of baby Azaria Chamberlain at Uluru in the notorious ‘dingo’s got my baby’ case.

24
Speaking her tribal language, Pitjantjatjara, through an interpreter Mrs Tjikatu said she wanted to show the Duchess what life is like for women around Uluru, which lies at the centre of an Aboriginal region known as NPY country for the three dialects of Western Desert language, the largest language group of Aboriginal Australia.
‘I want to give [the Duchess] a present and make her feel happy to be here,’ Mrs Tjikatu said, ‘maybe this necklace.’
Mrs Tjikatu and her extended family have made special necklaces from batwing coral seeds and Quandong pods for the royal couple.
But she also has a special gift – a basket of paintings on paper made from a new art medium invented by Mrs Tjikatu and local community workers – wallaby poo.
Made from the droppings of the local endangered Rufous Hare Wallaby or Mala collected by park rangers around the rock, boiled and washed and mixed with a bit of glitter ‘for the royals’.

Then it’s off to Uluru, where they will be taken on a walk around the base of one of the largest monoliths in the world, with a circumference of almost ten kilometres, and shown ancient Aboriginal rock art and a sacred waterhole before enjoying a ‘romantic’ late afternoon stroll.
The Duke and Duchess are expected to witness the rare sight of rain cascading off Uluru when they visit Australia’s most iconic site.
Recent rain in the Red Centre over the past few weeks means they will be among the only 1 per cent of visitors who see waterfalls pouring off the surface of the rock.
After which they will reportedly spend a cosy night together at the luxury camping resort, Longitude 101, where the evening temperature may drop to 15 degrees centigrade.

25

Allegation: Woman says husband fitted tracker in her belly

10274101_879570988726595_488379958888206842_n
LAHORE:

A woman from the Ghaziabad area alleged that her husband installed a device in her body that allows him to track all her movements.

An additional district and sessions judge sought comments from a Ghaziabad SHO in a petition filed by a woman seeking registration of a case against four men – including her husband and a judicial magistrate – for rape. She also submitted that her husband had fixed a tracker in her belly to monitor her movement.

Petitioner S* submitted that she married accused Muhammad Fiaz six years ago and was subsequently forced into prostitution.

She described an incident when her husband along with serving judicial magistrate Akram Azad came to her house in a drunken stupor and raped her. After this incident, her husband allegedly also brought other men, Mushtaq and Saleem, who also raped her.

Soon after, she said she separated from her husband, who later came to her house with an accomplice and made her inhale chemical fumes which caused her to fall unconscious.

She contended that when she regained consciousness, she found herself in the Services Hospital with stitches on her stomach. She said that her suspicions arose when her husband would easily track her down despite her being secretive about her whereabouts.

She claimed that a doctor revealed through an X-ray that a tracking device had been planted inside her. She prayed to the court to direct the respondent to register a case against the accused persons as the police had refused to help her.

Published in The Express Tribune, April 22nd, 2014.

The wonders of our world: Breath-taking shots taken around the planet by photographers hoping to win the Smithsonian Photo Contest

The stunning beauty of nature and diversity of the human race is captured in a series of photographs that have been submitted for this year’s Smithsonian Annual Photo Contest.
The range of entries is impressive and shows the diversity of our planet and its inhabitants.
The competition was open to professional photographers and amateurs alike.
Smithsonian photo editors received more than 50,000 photographers from 132 different countries. They’ve whittled the selection down to 60.
Ten were selected from each of six categories: The Natural World, Travel, People, Americana, Altered Images and Mobile, a new category this year.
After looking at this year’s finalists, readers can vote for their favourite by visiting the website.
The organization is also running a video competition for the second year running too.

Tags: Breath,planet,photographers,Smithsonian,Photo,Contest,series,Annual,inhabitants,competition,amateurs,editors,selection,categories,Natural,World,Travel,People,Americana,Images,Mobile,category,finalists,readers

Forget wearable tech, embeddable implants are already here

Smartphone mapping features are great for getting directions, until you lose signal. But you could avoid getting lost in the woods with a guiding system embedded in your body.

 

Throw away the headphones -- magnets implanted inside the ear can now play music directly into your head. Rich Lee received a pair of "internal headphones" last year.

Throw away the headphones — magnets implanted inside the ear can now play music directly into your head. Rich Lee received a pair of “internal headphones” last year.

Electronic tattoo producers MC 10 want to "extend human capabilities" invisibly, as well as keep us safe. They've launched band-aid sized "Hydration Patch" which sends information to your smartphone.

Electronic tattoo producers MC 10 want to “extend human capabilities” invisibly, as well as keep us safe. They’ve launched band-aid sized “Hydration Patch” which sends information to your smartphone.

Retina implants that restore the sight of blind patients are already on the market. Grinders hope that future implants will not just restore sight, but improve it.

Retina implants that restore the sight of blind patients are already on the market. Grinders hope that future implants will not just restore sight, but improve it.

We've found electronic throat tattoos, password pills and memory chips. Find out how "grinders" are already embracing our cyborg future...

We’ve found electronic throat tattoos, password pills and memory chips. Find out how “grinders” are already embracing our cyborg future…

Researchers at the University of Southern California hope to test a device in the next two years that will restore memory capabilities for people with brain injuries. The ultimate goal: to cure Alzheimer's.

Researchers at the University of Southern California hope to test a device in the next two years that will restore memory capabilities for people with brain injuries. The ultimate goal: to cure Alzheimer’s.

Implants in ears are already changing lives, too. in June, 3-year-old Grayson Clamp heard for the first time thanks auditory brain stem implant.

Implants in ears are already changing lives, too. in June, 3-year-old Grayson Clamp heard for the first time thanks auditory brain stem implant.

Last year, Motorola Mobility (then owned by Google) announced a temporary electronic throat tattoo that could communicate with smartphones, tablets and devices like Google Glass. Which body part will Google take over next?

Last year, Motorola Mobility (then owned by Google) announced a temporary electronic throat tattoo that could communicate with smartphones, tablets and devices like Google Glass. Which body part will Google take over next?

Electronic tattoos containing tiny circuits could be the future of healthcare monitoring. Professor John Rogers created "Biostamps" that are capable of tracking vital signs including heart rate, hydration and temperature.

Electronic tattoos containing tiny circuits could be the future of healthcare monitoring. Professor John Rogers created “Biostamps” that are capable of tracking vital signs including heart rate, hydration and temperature.

Subdermal RFID chips have been on the market for a while. Now, they can hold a lot more data than ever before, and could replace your smartphone and tablet passwords.

Subdermal RFID chips have been on the market for a while. Now, they can hold a lot more data than ever before, and could replace your smartphone and tablet passwords.

Motorola is now reportedly developing a pill that will do the same.

Motorola is now reportedly developing a pill that will do the same.

Electronic engineer and biohacker Brian McEvoy has designed the first internal compass, and will be the first test subject. The ‘Southpaw’ — inspired by the North Paw bracelet – works by sealing a miniature compass inside a silicon coat, within a rounded Titanium shell, to be implanted under the skin. An ultra-thin whisker juts out, which is activated when the user faces north, to lightly brush an alert on the underside of the skin.

“For a disc shape, it would be best located near shoulder”, says McEvoy, ahead of the procedure. “I don’t foresee any safety issues”. Materials and shape have been chosen for the body’s tolerance of them, but the Minnesota biohacker is working with experts to minimize risk before going under the knife.

Watch this video

Vacuum cleaning robot saves the day

Although McEvoy alone will take the implant, Southpaw has been a collaborative project, developed through the leading forum Biohack.me, that draws on the shared knowledge of citizen science labs around the world. For these dedicated blue-sky enthusiasts with stated goals that include eternal life and learning to fly, the paradigm for technology has gone beyond wearable, to implanted.

Watch this video

Is wireless electricity within reach?

Magnets and microchips are standard for community members, often for aesthetic or novelty value. But the implants are growing in sophistication to offer practical applications, such as the ‘Circadia’ micro-computer developed by Biohack.me offshoot company Grindhouse Wetware, which CEO Tim Cannon embedded in his arm last year, and was able to collect and transmit temperature data via Bluetooth.

Watch this video

Can spider silk help you self-heal?

 

Another of the forum’s stars, Rich Lee has pioneered the use of magnets. With one embedded in each ear he can listen to music through them, via a wire coil he wore around his neck, that converts sound into electromagnetic fields, creating the first ‘internal headphones’.

But his experiments go far beyond sound. “It is a sixth sense”, says Lee. “The implants allow me to detect different sensors, so I can ‘hear’ heat from a distance. I can detect magnetic fields and Wi-Fi signals, so much of the world that I had no awareness of.”

There is a practical purpose to Lee’s experiments, as he suffers deteriorating eyesight and hopes to improve his orientation through greater sensory awareness, and is learning to navigate through echolocation. But he sees his self-hacking as a voyage of discovery rather than a medical trial.

“It’s almost erotic when you feel something totally unexpected when there was no sensation before. You want to enquire and learn more. This is an adventure for me.”

Appropriately enough, a priority among Lee’s 130 projects are ‘adult industry’ implants for erogenous zones to maximize pleasure, for which he anticipates major commercial interest. Another device for the nose would aim to control the body temperature, which could increase endurance and physical capacity.

Lee is convinced that improving implants equate to a better body and a better life, and puts no limit on what procedure he would undergo. “If better models come out every 18 months I would buy them. The way people are with cellphones, I feel the same way about implants.”

Availability looks set to improve. Writer and biohacker Frank Swain, who with degenerative hearing, has secured commercial backing for a new type of implant that would convert environmental data — such as Wifi signals, into sounds that allow the user to orientate themselves. A prototype will be unveiled this fall.

On a larger scale, several hundred RFID tags are being shipped around the world to backers of a successful crowd funding campaign. Amal Graafstra, an implant enthusiast who received his first tag in 2005, launched the campaign through his start-up Dangerous Things and claims it is the largest non-medical implantation program yet.

It’s almost erotic when you feel something totally unexpected when there was no sensation before.

Implant pioneer Rich Lee

“We’re the first to put near field communication (NFC) compliant implants on the market like this”, says Graafstra, adding that recent breakthroughs have facilitated chips with greater memory and potential. “There are 880 bytes of space, relative to 97 in the previous generation, so before you could keep a name and phone number but now it has far greater capacity.”

Graafstra already uses his implants as universal passwords, unlocking physical and electronic barriers. Similar technology is already widely used in contactless card payment systems and clothing tags, and Motorola are developing an RFID-activated ‘password pill’ that a user can swallow and access their devices without the hassle of remembering them.

Graafstra recommends the people buying his tags have the procedures professionally implanted through vetted specialists, but includes a DIY guide for those who insist on going it alone. “I mainly got into this to encourage safety standards”, says Graffstra. “When I first started people were using the wrong equipment and having horrible accidents, this is a step to standardizing procedures.”

In the US and across much of Europe, professional medics would be forbidden from implanting the device, and there is widespread distrust of biohackers. “Anyone doing this to themselves should stop”, says Dr. Anthony Guiseppe-Elie, professor of bioengineering at the University of South Carolina, and editor of ‘Bioengineering’ journal, stressing the medical principle to solve problems rather than enhance healthy people.

Yet Guiseppe-Elie accepts the biohackers could be drivers for public acceptance of emerging technologies such as cochlear and retina implants, that have had dramatic successes in improving the conditions of hearing and sight-impaired people.

dangerous-things-rfid-tag-entertain-feature

Wave to unlock doors: Dangerous Things sells a password tag for implanting at home.
Courtesy Dangerous Things

“Public perception has been the main barrier — implants make people uncomfortable”, says Guiseppe-Elie. “But we have seen that they can have a huge impact.” RFID implants are also of proven value with Alzheimer’s patients, he adds, and their use could be extended.

To minimize the invasiveness, Guiseppe-Elie suggests two major considerations. “They must be small, and easily powered, so that repeat operations are not necessary.” For the latter consideration, induction coils and biofuel cells that use the body’s energy are evolving solutions.

Anyone doing this to themselves should stop.

Dr. Anthony Guiseppe-Elie, professor of bioengineering

A further direction, which his team is researching, are “electronic tattoos” equipped with sensors that sit on the skin and can measure vital signs without invasive surgery, and transmit them via wireless technology. The tattoos have been a popular concept and are in commercial development, marketed for versatility — they can be applied on the body, as well as relatively casual use — they could be applied by patients themselves.

The tattoos could also be applied to the head to read brainwaves, although the distance would limit accuracy. Implants for the brain could tell more, but represent the highest risk as well as reward. Should the body reject any material it could kill the patient.

Yet the Wellcome Trust in the UK has begun a trial with Alzheimer’s patients carrying a silicon chip on the brain itself, to predict dangerous episodes, and able to stimulate weakened neurons. Military researchers Darpa are also experimenting with a chip implant on humans to help control mental trauma suffered by soldiers.

This latter case challenges the medical principle against using implants to do more than return to humans their natural faculties, as Darpa believe their chip could eventually condition soldiers to battle-readiness through improvements such as awareness, memory and mood. Whether it is industry or enthusiasts pushing the limits, it seems 100% is no longer enough, as the add-ons become available and increasingly powerful.

Blood up the walls and a gun on the floor: The grisly scene that met police on arrival at Pistorius’ villa after he shot dead his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp

  • Photographs show the blood soaked bathroom in his villa in Pretoria
  • Gun used to kill Miss Steenkamp lies on a mat next to bloodied cricket bat
  • Blade Runner, 27, claims he used the bat to break down the toilet door

    A blood splattered cricket bat, a pistol on the mat and a pool of blood at the bottom of the stairs – this is the horrific scene faced by police when they entered Oscar Pistorius’s home.
    The photographs show the blood soaked bathroom in his villa in Pretoria where the runner shot his model girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on February 14, 2013.
    The gun used to kill Miss Steenkamp lies on a small mat while a bloodied cricket bat lies nearby.
    This photographs shows the blood soaked bathroom in the villa in Pretoria where a pistol lies on a mat near to a blood splattered cricket bat which the runner claims he used to break down the door after shooting his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp by accident on Valentine’s Day last year
    1
    This photographs shows the blood soaked bathroom in the villa in Pretoria where a pistol lies on a mat near to a blood splattered cricket bat which the runner claims he used to break down the door after shooting his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp by accident on Valentine’s Day last year

    The Olympic Blade Runner, 27, claims he used the bat to break down the toilet door after he shot his
    girlfriend by mistake.
    Another image shows a pool of blood at the bottom of the staircase as well as specks on the walls.

     

    Pistorius was expected to take to the stand last week to testify at his murder trial but court was immediately adjourned because one of the judge’s two assessors was unwell in hospital.
    The double-amputee Paralympic champion is facing 25 years to life in prison if convicted of premeditated murder for killing lover Reeva Steenkamp.
    Grim: Another image shows a pool of blood at the bottom of the staircase in Pistorius’s villa. Blue arrows point to specks of blood on the wall and floor

    2
    Grim: Another image shows a pool of blood at the bottom of the staircase in Pistorius’s villa. Blue arrows point to specks of blood on the wall and floor
    In this close up shot the gun used to kill Reeva Steenkamp lies on a bathmat in the bathroom next to blood smeared across the floor 
    3
    In this close up shot the gun used to kill Reeva Steenkamp lies on a bathmat in the bathroom next to blood smeared across the floor
    Inside: Blood is splattered on the floor of the bathroom where Reeva Steenkamp was shot    4
    Inside: Blood is splattered on the floor of the bathroom where Reeva Steenkamp was shot
    Defence lawyers for the runner, who is the only eyewitness in the case, were due to begin their case last week after four weeks of prosecution-led testimony.
    But Judge Thokozile Masipa said that one of her two assessors, legal experts who are helping her with the case, was unwell and that the trial had to be delayed until April 7 as the court would not be properly constituted.
    Prosecutors took 15 days to lay out their case against the 27-year-old, arguing he deliberately killed Steenkamp in the early hours of Valentine’s Day last year by firing four rounds from a 9 mm pistol through a closed toilet door.
    The cricket bat which Pistorius says he used to beat down the bathroom door 5
    The door leading to the bathroom where Miss Steenkamp was found 6
    The bloodied cricket bat (left) and the door leading to the bathroom where Miss Steenkamp was found (right)
    Adjourned: Oscar Pistorius, left, leaves the high court in Pretoria, South Africa, on Friday 7
    Adjourned: Oscar Pistorius, left, leaves the high court in Pretoria, South Africa, on Friday
    Pistorius shot Steenkamp, a 29-year-old model, through the closed door of a toilet cubicle in his home in the night, later saying he mistook her for an intruder 8
    Pistorius shot Steenkamp, a 29-year-old model, through the closed door of a toilet cubicle in his home in the night, later saying he mistook her for an intruder
    Several neighbours testified to hearing a woman’s terrified screams before a volley of shots, countering Pistorius’ assertions that he mistook Steenkamp for an intruder hiding in the toilet cubicle in the middle of the night.
    The world-famous athlete pleaded not guilty to the murder charge and also not guilty to three other firearm-related counts.
    The trial has gripped South Africa and millions of athletics fans around the world who saw Pistorius as a symbol of triumph over physical adversity.

    Oops! £300,000 Lamborghini Aventador with top speed of 215mph is wrecked after three-car crash in centre of Knightsbridge

    • Vehicle has been filmed being driven aggressively in the past with flames firing out of its uprated exhaust
    • Parked BMW and Mazda 5 worth a fraction of the price also involved in yesterday’s accident on Sloane Street
    • Lamborghini apparently involved in collision with Mazda, with the supercar then hitting stationary BMW
    • Dozens of curious bystanders surrounded Lamborghini to take pictures and film badly-damaged matte black car

    This 217mph Lamborghini Aventador was going nowhere in a hurry after it was involved in a three-car smash on one of London’s most expensive streets
    The £300,000 top-end vehicle has been filmed being driven aggressively in the past with flames firing out of its uprated exhaust.
    But it was turned into a depressing wreck yesterday afternoon after suffering serious frontal damage with bits of its bodywork strewn all over the road.

     

    article-2593236-1CB5B4B600000578-322_964x643 article-2593236-1CB5B4D600000578-943_964x643 article-2593236-1CB5B4F100000578-6_964x642 article-2593236-1CB5B4F500000578-32_964x544 article-2593236-1CB5B4FD00000578-138_964x643 article-2593236-1CB5B51D00000578-458_964x643 article-2593236-1CB5B53D00000578-824_964x643 article-2593236-1CB5B52500000578-42_964x642 article-2593236-1CB5B53100000578-345_964x539 article-2593236-1CB5B53500000578-399_964x540 article-2593236-1CB5B53900000578-602_964x540 article-2593236-1CB5B54100000578-558_964x732

    A parked BMW and a Mazda 5 – worth a fraction of the price of the supercar – were also involved in the accident on Sloane Street in Knightsbridge.
    It is thought the Lamborghini was involved in a collision with the Mazda, with the supercar then hitting the stationary BMW.
    Dozens of curious bystanders surrounded the Lamborghini to take pictures and film the badly-damaged matte black car.

    The BMW involved is owned by art consultant Lila Afshar, who returned from a Mother’s Day lunch with her two daughters to see the crash wreckage.
    She told the London Evening Standard: ‘We showed up about three hours after the incident and there was a letter on the windshield.
    ‘The Lamborghini was being towed away and the owner came up and explained what had happened. He was really apologetic about it.’

    Paul Wallace, from motoring enthusiasts’ website the Supercar Scene, said he saw the smashed-up car shortly after the accident.
    ‘I got a call to say someone had reported the Lamborghini crash on Sloane Street, and had heard this particular Aventador had been racing all day.
    ‘This car is known in London but I had never seen it before. From YouTube videos he enjoys to drive it fast and rev the engine to create exhaust flames.
    ‘It’s a very nice example of the Aventador so I wonder whether we’ll see it on the road again.
    ‘The owner seemed young and was with a group of friends after the crash who all seemed relaxed bearing in mind the wreckage on the road.
    ‘I have never seen a Lamborghini in such a bad way, and couldn’t really believe my eyes or ears when I heard about this crash.’

    The crash happened outside the home of Lalit Kumar Modi, the founder of the Indian Premier League, who tweeted about the accident.
    The Metropolitan Police closed the road in both directions for almost an hour. No arrests have been made following the crash.
    Minutes before the smash, the car was filmed being driven aggressively by its owner. 
    The driver was breathalysed and his car was loaded onto the back of a lorry to be driven away.
    The Lamborghini Aventador is powered by a 6.5-litre V12 engine which develops a staggering 700bhp.
    It will accelerate from 0-62mph in just 2.9 seconds and go all the way to 217mph – more than three times the speed limit on motorways.